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Battle of Badr

Battle of Badr 

The Battle of Badr is considered to be one of the most crucial and renowned battles in Islamic history. The battle occurred between the Muslims and the polytheists of Quraysh during the early years of Islam, on the 17th of Ramadan, 624 CE. Before their migration to Medina, the Muslims of Mecca were the target of the polytheists of Quraysh, as they were mistreated, tortured, exiled from their homes, and denied the right to perform hajj. Once the Muslims had reached Medina, and after receiving permission from God to fight against the oppression of the polytheists, they began to carry out multiple operations to try and harm the trade caravans of the Quraysh prior to the Battle of Badr. However they were unsuccessful in all but one attempt. One and a half months before the Battle of Badr, one polytheist, ‘Amr b. al-Hadrami was killed, while two others were captured. One of the failed operations to pillage the caravans of the Quraysh was that of Abu Sufyan, who was on his way from Gaza to Mecca, who warned the people of Mecca as he pleaded for their help to protect his caravan. With the caravan on its way to Mecca, the Holy Prophet (s.a.w) and his army of 313 soldiers left for Mecca to face an army of 950 men that was rounded by Abu Sufiyan’s warning and commanded by Abu Jahal. The two armies made their way to Badr, in which the Prophet’s army is said to have arrived on the 17th of Ramadan. The battle of Badr was completed with the martyrdom of 14 Muslims and death of 70 Polytheists, as well as the capture, which concluded the victory of the Muslims.